Tagged in: Nationals

Howie Kendrick retires after 15 MLB seasons

Howie Kendrick announced his retirement Monday after 15 major league seasons.

In an Instagram post, Kendrick thanked each of the teams he played for in the majors, concluding with the Washington Nationals, the team he won a World Series title with in 2019.

“To the fans, without your support and love for the game, our stage and lights would not shine as brightly as they do. Know you will be missed as well. I will always love the game of baseball and will constantly reflect on the lifelong memories made. For now, it’s time to drop the mic and enter a new stage of my life,” he wrote.

In 2019, Kendrick was the MVP of the National League Championship Series and hit the go-ahead homer in Game 7 of the World Series to help the Nationals victory the franchise’s first title.

Kendrick, 37, hit .275 with two home runs and 14 RBIs during the pandemic-shortened 2020 season for the Nationals. The team declined his $6.5 million mutual option for 2021 after the season, and he received a $2.25 million buyout from Washington.

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The veteran infielder went on the injured list with a left hamstring injury on Sept. 9 and was shut down for the season.

In four seasons with the Nats, Kendrick hit .316 with 30 home runs and 113 RBIs.

Overall, Kendrick was a career .294 hitter with 127 home runs and 724 RBIs. In addition to the Nationals, Kendrick played two seasons with the Los Angeles Dodgers, nine seasons with the Los Angeles Angels and 39 games with the Philadelphia Phillies in the 2017 season.

Kendrick, a Florida native, was initially drafted by the Angels with a 10th round pick in 2002. His steady production as the Angels’ regular second baseman for several seasons established him as a solidly underrated player. Kendrick’s later career saw him become a multi-position specialist and veteran bat for multiple teams.

Last season, Kendrick’s production slipped across the abbreviated 2020 season, but suffice it to say he’s securely a Nationals franchise legend for that home run above.

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Philadelphia Phillies to retire Dick Allen’s No.15 next month

On Thursday, the Philadelphia Phillies informed that they will retire No. 15 in honor of Dick Allen. The Phillies will host a ceremony honoring Allen on Sept. 3 — the 57th anniversary of Allen’s MLB debut — prior to their game versus the Nationals.

The Phillies also said that they will honor Allen during the 2021 season, when presumably fans will be permitted in attendance. 

“Dick Allen burst onto the 1964 Phillies and immediately established himself as a superstar,” Phillies owner John Middleton said in a press release.

“His legendary performance on the field gave millions of fans lasting memories, and he helped cement my love for baseball and the Phillies as a young boy.

The Phillies organization is thrilled to give Dick and his family this honor that recognizes his Hall of Fame-worthy career and his legacy as one of the greatest Phillies of all time.”

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Allen is the first non-Hall of Famer in Phillies history to have his number retired.

In 2014, Allen was a candidate for the Baseball Hall of Fame via the Golden Era Committee. He fell one vote shy of the required 12 votes needed for election into the Hall. He will join Hall of Famers Richie Ashburn (1), Jim Bunning (14), Mike Schmidt (20), Steve Carlton (32), Roy Halladay (34) and Robin Roberts (36) as the only Phillies in team history to have their numbers retired.

Allen, who spent 15 years in MLB, is known for the impressive power numbers he accomplished while playing during a pitcher-dominated era in baseball.

The seven-time All Star, who played the two corner infield spots and left field, and also spent time playing for the Cardinals, Dodgers, White Sox and Athletics. In his nine campaigns with the Phillies (1963-77), he batted .290 with 204 doubles, 204 home runs, 655 RBI, a .371 on-base percentage and a .530 slugging percentage (.902 OPS) in 1,070 games.

The 1964 National League Rookie of the Year owns the second-best slugging percentage in Phillies history, behind only Hall of Famer Chuck Klein (.553).

Allen also led the league in OPS four times in his career, including twice with the Phillies in 1966 (1.027) and 1967 (.970).

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