Tagged in: retirement

Fury reiterates talk of retiring after 2 more fights

After teasing a retirement in the near-future in the lead-up to his rematch versus Deontay Wilder, Tyson Fury doubled down on his idea of retirement after fighting out the last two bouts on his contract with Top Rank Boxing.

“I’ve got two more fights left, and then we’re going to really think about what we’re going to do from there, said Fury, who was a guest alongside his wife Paris on “This Morning” on ITV in the United Kingdom on Wednesday.

“Because how long is a piece of string? I’m undefeated in 31 professional fights. This is my 12th year as a professional.”

Tyson later circled back to the thought of an early retirement, saying, “I’ll come back, and I’ll have two more fights, and hopefully we’ll sail into the sunset.”

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“It’s almost an anti-climax. You elevate yourself in your mind and body to go and box at this level, and nothing means anything apart from the fight on that night. And then it’s almost like you win, and it’s like, ‘Oh well, I’ve done that now,’ and then I’ve gotta slide down the other side. It usually takes me about two weeks to get back to normal after a massive fight.”

Fury says he is in good condition.

While Fury said he feels good about boxing Wilder, and then Joshua once that’s done, he also claimed he felt no particular inspiration from the opportunity of winning all of Joshua’s belts and becoming undisputed heavyweight champion of the world.

“As far as I’m concerned, Anthony Joshua’s only got my leftovers, because I never lost those belts. I had to vacate them for mental health problems,” Fury said.

“They’re my belts. Until a man is defeated in a boxing ring, how can you claim to be the champion when you haven’t beat the champion? I beat the dominant heavyweight of our era, [Wladimir Klitschko], 26 title defenses, and went to Germany to do it. Then I went to America and beat the guy that nobody wanted to fight.”

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Rams safety Eric Weddle announces retirement after 13 season

Safety Eric Weddle’s career has ended after 13 NFL seasons. 

The six-time Pro Bowler announced his retirement Thursday.

Per The Athletic’s Rich Hammond, the Los Angeles Rams will get $4.75 million in cap space back for 2020 and a $500,000 cap credit for 2019. 

Weddle tweeted last month that he underwent his first-ever surgery at age 35. 

Per NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport, the surgery was a meniscus trim, and Weddle’s recovery was estimated to take just weeks. 

The Rams signed Weddle to a two-year contract last March. He started all 16 matches and finished second on the team with 108 combined tackles last season.  Weddle’s NFL career began in 2007 when the San Diego Chargers drafted him No. 37 overall out of Utah. He became a full-time starter in his second season and was a staple of the Chargers secondary for nine years.

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The Baltimore Ravens signed Weddle to a four-year deal after the 2015 season.

The California native started all 48 games during his three years with the team before being released in March 2019. 

In addition to the career accomplishments Weddle listed in his tweet, he also led the NFL with seven interceptions in 2011 and was named Mountain West Defensive Player of the Year in each of his final two seasons at Utah. 

“He’s played a lot, had a great career,” Rams coach Sean McVay said after the season. “I’m very thankful and I’ve learned a lot from him.”

A six-time Pro Bowl selection and two-time All-Pro, Weddle finishes his career with 29 interceptions, including four returned for touchdowns, eight forced fumbles, seven fumble recoveries, 9.5 sacks and 98 pass deflections.

With the retirement of Weddle — who is also known for his signature beard and ice cream triumph celebrations — the Rams are expected to promote second-year pro Taylor Rapp to a starting role to play alongside John Johnson.

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Wozniacki to retire after 2020 Australian Open

Caroline Wozniacki, a former No. 1-ranked tennis player, announced she will retire from the sport after the 2020 Australian Open. The 29-year-old is presently ranked No. 37 in the world and has 30 career singles titles since turning pro in 2005.

Wozniacki first shared the news during an appearance Friday on “Good Morning America,” telling the hosts she was “ready to move on to the next chapter of my life.” She then shared a statement on social media.

Wozniacki won the 2018 Australian Open, her lone Grand Slam title, with a win over top seed Simona Halep. The Denmark native was runner-up at the 2009 U.S. Open and the 2010 WTA Tour Championships, earning the No. 1 ranking for 71 weeks between 2010 and ’11.

Her most recent match was a semifinal defeat to Naomi Osaka at the China Open. She said the retirement has nothing to do with her health and more to do with what else she wants to accomplish in life, as well as leaving the sport on a high note.

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Wozniacki struggled in 2019, not winning a singles title for the first time in her career as she battled injuries and dropping from the top five.

The year prior, 10 months after winning her first slam title, she announced a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

In June, Wozniacki married former New York Knicks player David Lee, and the couple recently moved to a condo on Fisher Island in Miami. One of the 18 tennis courts at the Palazzo Del Sol facility in Fisher Island is named after the tennis star.

In her social media announcement, Wozniacki said she wants to start a family while traveling and promoting awareness about rheumatoid arthritis. She also started classes at Harvard Business School this past September.

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Freese, 2011 Series MVP, retires after 11 seasons

David Freese, the 2011 World Series Most Valuable Player with the St. Louis Cardinals, revealed his retirement on Saturday after 11 seasons.

“Padres, Cardinals, Angels, Pirates, and Dodgers. You took a 23-year old kid out of college and pushed him to 36,” wrote Freese in a social media post, thanking all the clubs he was a part of during his career.

“Can’t thank you enough for that. Needed it. Will never stop thinking about the days I got to be around such wonderful people playing this game. As I move forward with the next phase of my life, I am forever grateful to all of you and the game of baseball.”

Freese, 36, spent the past two seasons with the Los Angeles Dodgers playing mostly first base, and also spent time with the Los Angeles Angels and Pittsburgh Pirates.

He was a career .277 hitter and even better in the postseason, with a .299 average. Freese made his final entrance Wednesday in a deciding Game 5 of an NL Division Series, striking out as a pinch hitter for the Los Angeles Dodgers. They lost 7-3 to the Washington Nationals. Freese had started Game 1 at first base.

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He made his major league debut with St. Louis in 2009 and turn out to be a postseason star two years later.

Freese batted .545 with 12 hits in the NL Championship Series in 2011. He also set an MLB postseason record with 21 RBIs and earned MVP honors in the NLCS and World Series.

Freese was an All-Star in 2012, when he played in a career-high 144 games after injuries had dogged him in previous years. In Game 1 of the NLCS versus San Francisco, he hit a two-run homer off Madison Bumgarner.

In his first 25 postseason games, Freese batted .386 with six homers, 25 RBIs and a .739 slugging percentage in 100 plate appearances. Only Carlos Beltran (.824) and Babe Ruth (.744) had higher slugging percentages in the same number of plate appearances.

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